Northgate

Europe's most expensive toll roads

Whether you’re planning a summer road trip across Europe, or just looking to drive to your next holiday destination, swapping crowded airports for the open road is a great opportunity to discover more of the countries your visiting.

However, when considering a driving holiday there’s plenty of additional costs to consider, petrol, ferry travel and overnight accommodation are some of the more obvious, but you may not have totalled up the cost of using the toll roads on route.

Here at Northgate, we’ve analysed 44 countries, looking at toll roads, bridges, and tunnels, to reveal the most expensive routes in Europe.

£52.59

France revealed to have the most expensive toll road in Europe

£22.85

The Great St. Bernard Tunnel connecting Italy and Switzerland, is the most expensive tunnel

£6.44

The amount it costs drivers to cross Denmark’s Storebælt bridge

1/4

of European countries including Finland, Estonia and Monaco have no tolls at all

£305

The total cost for HGV drivers to drive the Marseille toll in France

Most Expensive Tolls Roads for Family Cars

Our analysis revealed that France is home to the most expensive toll road, with drivers travelling from Paris to Marseille (along the A6 / A7) required to pay £52.59 one way, meaning a return journey will set holiday makers back over £100.

The Italian route from Milan to Naples was revealed to be the second most expensive, costing £50.73 per journey and Boda to Oslo in Norway came in third, setting drivers back £45.16.

Surprisingly, whilst known for being expensive in the UK, the M6 toll road only ranked 15th in our analysis, with drivers required to pay £6.60 for their journey.

A new destination to consider, North Macedonia offers drivers the cheapest option when it comes to toll roads, with the 37KM route from Petrovec to Veles costing just £1.15.

Travellers looking to experience both Norway and Sweden will be pleased to hear that the Svinesundsbron bridge connecting both countries costs just £1.74 to cross. In comparison, the most expensive tunnel in our study, The Great St Bernard in Switzerland will set drivers back £22.85.

The Sozina tunnel in Montenegro and the Dublin Port tunnel in Ireland were the cheapest tunnels in our analysis, costing drivers just £2.22 and £2.58 respectively.

Explore the interactive map below to discover the expensive route by country and the associated cost.

Currency
£$
Rank
Country
Most expensive road
Cost of toll (family car)
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Most expensive toll roads for HGV drivers

With Brexit upon us, many transport businesses will be totting up the additional costs associated with pan-European travel. But with toll roads making up 7% of the overall transportation cost in Western Europe, how much are businesses paying per HGV to travel across Europe?

The A6:A7 Paris to Marseille route might be costly for holidaymakers but it’s even more expensive for HGV drivers, with a one-way journey costing £305.24.

The Great St Bernard tunnel, which connects Western Switzerland to Italy is the second most expensive route for HGV drivers, setting businesses back £137.26 per journey. The Bodo to Oslo route in Norway is the third most expensive for HGV drivers costing £116.84, over 150% more than the same route for a family car.

In comparison, driving from Petrovec to Veles in North Macedonia will cost drivers just £3.17, the cheapest out of the routes analysed.

The Dublin Port tunnel in Ireland and the Vadlaheidargong tunnel in Iceland are also amongst the cheapest routes in our analysis, with both costing under £10 to use for HGV drivers.

Rank
Country
Currency
Most expensive road
Cost of toll (lorry or HGV)
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{{x.currency}}
{{x.expensive_road}}
{{getCost(x.cost_of_toll)}}

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For van hire in Birmingham or to hire a van near you, head to our website for more information.

Data Methodology

We analysed available data in 44 European countries, to find out toll road names, lengths and the associated charges.

We used https://www.tolls.eu/ to find a directly of local sources on vehicle tolls, including state Departments of Transport.

Where possible, specific toll prices were listed, in some cases in which tolls were priced per km, we estimated the length of the toll road before using this figure for the calculation.

Bridges, tunnels and other tolled roadways were also included in the study.

Listed toll charges based on an average family car under 3.5 tonnes in weight - data for motorcycles wasn’t collected, data for HGVs can be found separately.

Data accurate as of November 2020.

Charges were converted from the listed local currency to GBP using Google’s currency converter. Currency values (1.34957 USD & 1.10880 EUR to GBP) accurate as of December 2020.